Don’t Burn Your Bridges

Hello fuzzbutts!

Work is rough. Work is tough. You’ve been slaving away at your job and having a difficult time. You’re looking for a way out, sending your info and resume out to find a new job. Finally, you find a new opportunity! You’re all set! Time to leave! Now you can give everyone a piece of your mind, flipping the bird as you make your triumphant exit.

Don’t do that. It’s not classy. Also, depending on your industry, it could easily come back to bite your tail. In Southern California, if you work in science, it’s a small world! There’s a ton of companies but turn-over is high and people scatter around quick. In my current job, I’ve seen technicians show up at our place of business where they all worked with my coworkers in my past. I’ve also heard people talk about giving references for other contacts. Sure, it might feel great to let everything boil over and spew over those jerks now that you’re leaving. Head out the door after unloading all your grievances and you can forget about references. Not only that, though. Those people will eventually move to new jobs for whatever reason and you’ll eventually leave this new job for something else. Imagine you apply for a job, have a decent interview, and then one of those people you unloaded on has a private word with the person considering to hire you. So much for the new new job.

On top of that, sometimes it’s not the job itself but your compensation for it. You’re looking for something new to earn more cash and feel a bit more appreciated. I’ve seen a lot of people where they start to slow down in their work, eventually to the point where multiple people are wondering “What do they even do anymore?” People remember the quality of your work at the end. If you’ve pretty much quit your job while still collecting a pay check, it builds a sour taste in the mouths of those around you. I had a great coworker who got tired of his job. We were friends until the last couple months when he gave up on the job and all his work went to me. Not cool, bruh.

Sometimes you know there’s a job out there where you don’t care about going back to there. I did seasonal work at the now-defunct Toys R Us and went in while sick. I eventually decided it wasn’t worth the effort. I went to the manager and let them know I wouldn’t be in tomorrow and that I was quitting. I didn’t storm in there, talk about how poorly run the place was or the crazy stressful situation of seasonal work at a toy store. I was polite, sick, and straight-forward. Granted it was still during the seasonal period so I knew there wouldn’t be a “next year” if I wanted to come back. That was a possibility I seriously considered and I still made the decision. With my career now, it’s important to keep a good, honest reputation because it turns out my contacts, especially my former director, know a lot of people around the country.

Anyway, the point is to be good to those around you, whether it’s at work or just in your daily life. You never know if you’ll meet up again and you need to weigh the short-term good feelings against the long term.

Good luck, fuzzbutts!

The Responsibility Question

Hi furries!

Had a pretty rough day recently when I found out there weren’t going to be any annual bonuses for anyone for 2018. The company didn’t meet its goals and funding is in bad shape. It’s easy to look around and wonder “Who is responsible for this?” when the real question is “What was I responsible for and is there a way for me to fix it?”

Was there anything I could have done? Maybe. I was already going outside the scope of my job description and then also assisting others in their projects to increase productivity around the lab. There’s times I could have done more but that’s about it now. Would this have added up to millions of dollars shortfall? Well no. I’m pretty great but not THAT great. So maybe there’s nothing I could do on my end to make up for that. Is there a way for me to fix it for them? Well not really that either.

So, after being a little down in the dumps about it, the responsibility question got deeper and I looked for what I am responsible for. I AM responsible for how I feel in my reaction to this news. I could feel down or I could put that energy to something useful. I AM responsible for picking my work. I could feel stuck and cheated or I could put more effort into looking for a new job. I AM responsible for where I work. So many people stay around SoCal expecting to find high-power jobs but if I want to be able to own a home and set down roots, I either have to move to a different state for work or find a second source of income here.

Asking these questions helps me re-align with my goals and come up with new ideas for plans and ways to keep moving ahead in my life. While I consider the options for myself, I want you to review everything and imagine you could take responsibility for some situation you’re in. If you can’t take responsibility for everything, identify what you can be responsible for.

Good luck, furries!

Are you Researching too much?

Hello fuzzbutts!
Are you all set with your chosen goals and ready to get started? Have you read endless amounts of material? Do you know ALL the things you’re supposed to do? Are you finding the wealth of knowledge from the internet? Have you actually done anything yet?
If the answer to the last one is No, then you might be falling into a trap. “Well I have to know what I’m supposed to do before I do it, right?” you ask, one ear perked with mistrust. Well sure. However, there is a point where you need to actually BEGIN the tasks you need to do.
Say you want to draw better. You can read any number of articles or watch the unending list of videos to learn drawing. Even if you finish every bit of those, when the time comes down to put pencil to paper, you’ll find your skills severely lacking. That is because, in your quest to become better at drawing, you neglected to do the one thing. DRAW!
Researching a skill, whether it’s fursuit building, drawing, or even fishing, doesn’t matter if you don’t put it to actual practice. For any skill, you have to practice. Research has to be considered a supplement to your practice, not a substitute for it. You may never feel ready if you constantly doubt whether or not you know enough. In order to get the most bang for your buck when it comes to learning something, you need to start practicing those skills and learn as much as you can along the way! Good luck!